Snippets from the Northwich Chronicle 1915

Snippets from the Northwich Chronicle 1915

Joint HLF MTC MR logoCEC logo
  
 
 
MUDC agreed that the Town Hall be used for purposes of the local war relief committee, rifle club, and scouts also that the Red Cross Society be allowed the use of rooms for the Nurses examinations for free.
 
Mrs Roylance Court has received a letter from her son-in-law Brigadier General Rolt in which he states that his brigade, who had been fighting at close quarters certainly for 4 days in rain and every discomfort, were asked if they would like to be replaced. They replied that they would rather see the thing through and stay and fight it out as they were.

General Rolt mentioned in dispatches, not long in the district but a member of the Roylance-Court family.
 

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{slider=Help from Wimboldsley Children}
Miss Hawker head mistress at the council school has sent to the Red Cross headquarters eight pairs of socks and four comforters, which have been worked by the scholars. The latter have also contributed 4s and the teachers 6s to the Red Cross Funds. The children, through the headmistress have also expressed a wish that the £1 distributed in prizes each year by Mrs W Roylance Court should be spent on materials for comforts for the soldiers.{/slider}
{slider=NCO Sergt. (Major) William Edge}
Mr O B Whitehead had known him since a boy and it was an honour to his parents to have such a brave son. They felt proud of him, and he was sure that Middlewich held him in high esteem for his distinction at the front.
 
Mr Lidbury was Edge’s old schoolmaster, he was very proud of him and he knew his parents were delighted with his success. {/slider}
{slider=The school children of Middlewich}
The school children of Middlewich by their own efforts had sent away to the front at least 80 woollen garments.{/slider}
{slider=Middlewich Habitation Primrose League and the Wimboldsley Township}
On behalf of the Middlewich Habitation Primrose League and the Wimboldsley Township, the Red Cross Society Mrs W Roylance-court has sent the following articles to the Manchester headquarters of the British Red Cross Society for soldiers and prisoners of war:- 152 pairs of socks, 197 pairs of mittens, 93 scarves, 120 various articles and 200 bandages. Mrs Courts bible class has “adopted” a prisoner of war belonging to the Cheshire Regiment.{/slider}
{slider=MUDC appealed for blankets, socks and comforts for the troops at the front}
In the first months of the war the Middlewich Urban District Council (MUDC) had a large amount of work and organisation to do.  They had to establish the various fund raising efforts without overlapping the workload of everyone concerned. In response to one of the many directives from the various ministers the MUDC appealed for blankets, socks and comforts for the troops at the front. Winter was fast approaching and the government realised that they could not supply all the troops with winter extras. The Middlewich ladies at the Red Cross HQ in Hightown responded immediately and with speed, and from the middle of September to the middle of November the teams of ‘knitters’ had sent 443 pairs of socks, 81 shirts, 125 comforts, 61 pairs of cuffs and 79 cholera belts. As a further fund-raiser the Red Cross branch held a Chrysanthemum Exhibition in the Town Hall followed by a café chantant.{/slider}
{slider=Progress of recruiting}
Progress of recruiting, Mr Hutchins, Manager of the Electro Bleach and By-Products Ltd., stated that his company would pay half wages to dependants of their men and re-instate them in their positions when they returned, Messer’s Murgatroyd’s initiated that they would do the same.
 
1914 – Large gathering at the Bull ring concerning the recruiting campaign, which was now in full swing…
 
The Rev J W Fortnum, who has entered so enthusiastically into the campaign, referred to the patriotism of two local medical men, Dr Hislop and Dr Murphy who had left for the front. He remarked upon the roll of honour which was exhibited in the Town Hall and said in time there would be another roll – a roll of dishonour; of strong and able bodied men who would not enlist. That roll, he thought would be headed by a good many farmers, because there had been no great response from the rural districts. He felt almost ashamed that in Middlewich Districts (Newton, Kinderton out to Byley, Bradwall, Yatehouse, Sproston, Wimboldsley, Warmingham, Croxton, Stanthorne and Clive), there were farmers who not only declined to go themselves but would not allow their men to go.
 
A forceful speech was made by Rev. W Hudson (Wesleyan Minister) who said despite the fact that large numbers had enlisted, and that armies had been sent by the colonies the cry was still for more men. Had we been able to send a million men at the beginning of the war our army would have been in Berlin by now?
 
Mr Stainer Hutchins, manager of the Electro-Bleach and By-Products. Ltd. Told the audience that he had been many times through Belgium and was struck by the happy home life he saw. And now let them think of these poor people driven from their homes and their womenfolk abused. Did Englishmen want their people to be treated as the Belgians had been? If Englishmen fully realised the danger which threatened this land, the difficulty would be to hold them back, not ask them to come forward.
 
Next speaker was Captain Gossett of Chester; from the 7th August up to that evening Cheshire had given Lord Kitchener’s New Army 11,161 men. Lord Kitchener was asking for 500,000 more. He bestowed a word of praise upon the recruiting work at Middlewich; he was pleased to say ‘had done quite as well as some towns twice as big’. He would still further be pleased to get another 100 men from Middlewich during the next week.
 
The Rev E G Auden, Rector of Byley put in a word for the Farmers by remarking that they were “between the devil and the deep sea”. On the one hand they were being urged to grow more corn and on the other hand recruiting officers were doing their best to get farm labourers to enlist. He suggested that as so many Belgians were coming into the country they might assist in farming operations.
 
O B Whitehead and Mr F Lidbury commented that during the last fortnight 52 recruits had gone from the town. Even yet the country did not fully comprehend the seriousness of the situation, and at the top of every church tower and public building he would have a black flag hoisted beaming the words “The country is in danger”{/slider}